Worklife balance – Is there such a thing?

When I was first asked to write about work/life balance, internally I chuckled. My life has at times been so unbalanced that I feel I’m an expert about what NOT to do.  As I have grown older and hopefully wiser, I have come to realise that to live a good life there needs to be moderation in everything.  Something I guess I am not good at.

Let me give you some background to help you understand where I am coming from.  From 1982 to 1992 I studied for my degrees part-time while working full time and trying to make my way up the corporate ladder.  That was a Bachelors Degree in Business with majors in Marketing and Economics and then an MBA.

While working at least 40 hours per week for my employers, I was adding another 40 hours (at least) a week in studies.  Work/Life Balance? I had none.

In fact, I was spelling “fun” as “w-o-r-k”!!!  If I wasn’t studying, I was working and if I wasn’t working, I was studying.  My friends were my fellow students and if we got together for an evening it was either completing assignments or preparing for exams.  Definitely not what you’d call a balanced life!

Today, for me, a work/life balance is where there is time and space for earning a living, enjoying the company of family and friends, having regular holidays, time to exercise and time to ruminate.  In other words balance occurs where there is equal distribution amongst all the aspects of one’s life.

Our lives are made up of many parts and these include:

➢ Contribution to society
➢ Work
➢ Family
➢ Spiritual Development
➢ Health
➢ Friends

Control – or Losing Control?

In the past, I definitely did not treat these areas of my life equally  – often because I felt I had no control over my time.

As I was half way through my MBA, I decided that I needed to go out there on my own and start my own business. I needed more control over my life and a better balance, or so I thought.

Well let me tell you, there is nothing like starting your own business while studying!!

Instead of working 80 hours a week, I was now working (and worrying) what felt like 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Even when my studies came to an end and I only had to concentrate on my business, I thought, at last, I’ll now have a chance for a better work/life balance.

Well, up until recently, I can say I have rarely had holidays longer than one week a year – if that for some years. I have attempted to balance all the parts of my life but with little success. Work seems to have always gained the upper hand.

Personality Drivers and Personal Values

Nowadays, I think I know why.

Balance in one’s life is based, I believe, on your personality drivers and personal values. In case you have not guessed yet, I am a type A personality – very achievement oriented, a workaholic. Everything I did in work needed to be as good as possible if not perfect….. exhausting isn’t it!

These drivers and values rarely let me rest – there was always something bigger or better to achieve. As a result there was little moderation in my life – everything was predominantly work/goal oriented. This was after all the only way I believed I could show the world I was worthwhile and of value.

Changing Values – and Thoughts to Achieve a New ‘Balance’.

A couple of years ago I realised I did not want to live my life this way anymore. I no longer wanted to buy into the long hours of the perfect executive. I wanted to get off the work treadmill.

To completely change my pattern of behaviour I recognised the need to fully understand what was driving me to achieve in work only. The first step was identifying where the drivers and values that motivated my current balance came from.

After a great deal of thought with some support from a wonderful coach and a few mentors, some of my drivers I would suggest I was born with, but a lot were and are the result of my family and school upbringing. I am of the opinion that these pre-set values or thinking can be changed over time with focus.

Over the past year, I have slowly changed some of my values and thoughts. Whether that is a result of conscious effort or age or both, I am not sure. I now no longer work on weekends – big step there! I am no longer driven to prove myself as much – I guess because I have already achieved much, to be truthful, and for which I am grateful. I now make the time to read, to get together with family and friends and to even look after myself.

My key thought that changed was that there was no need for balance – it was ALL my life. I did however have a choice whether I want to work hard or whether I want time to play. It is MY values that will drive whether I really achieve balance or not in my life.

Each one of us needs to find our own balance amongst all the different aspects of our lives. But first I believe we need to understand the values and drivers we hold about our self worth and those values we want to hold close. It is your choice how you live your life. The idea of ‘balance’ is such a personal thing – but something that is in OUR control.

 

If you would like to better understand your drivers, and values – and create your balance in 2019, book in for a complimentary 45 min coaching session. Enquire Now.

Are you starved of Information

Are You Starved of Intelligence?

As laudable as it may be to make some decisions instead of no decisions there is now a major change in the dynamics of the decision-making environment. While information is more abundant than ever before, managers are intelligent information starved!

Yesterday’s information and methods are increasingly ineffective for making today’s decisions – and even less effective for identifying tomorrow’s opportunities, problems, and unknown competitors.

Competitive Intelligence

Competitive Intelligence, or CI as it is commonly referred to, has grown as a specialist management discipline around the world as companies face tougher and faster competition. In fact, CI in large successful multinational organisations is becoming a “must have” rather than a “nice to have”. Recent studies from the USA indicate that budgets for CI now range up to and over US$4 million per annum and that rates of return can be as high as 4000%.

In the past, Australian businesses have been slow to practise effective Competitive Intelligence. One reason I believe is that many Australian companies think they are already practising Competitive Intelligence. Although all managers intuitively carry out some form of CI, the information explosion, fake news, changing technology, and increasing global competitive pressures mean that there is an increasing need to develop more systematic ways of using CI.

Today, some are beginning to realise it is a strict discipline that selects and delivers the right insights to support key decision-makers, a discipline focused on the external environment, maximising the company’s competitiveness, optimising time and profit, while minimising risk.

CI relates to the techniques used to interpret and analyse external information and communicate it to the right people for timely and effective use. It is ethical and legal and right now it is estimated that over 90% of what one will ever need to answer an executive’s questions, is already in the public domain. Maybe not in the form that will directly answer questions, but the pieces of the intelligence jigsaw are always there.

Information Collection, Analysis and Interpretation

It is important to note that intelligence or insight is never found – it is created specifically as a result of information collection, analysis and interpretation. It is the insight from the analysis that enables executives to make sharper and smarter decisions.

The most significant issue that sets this process apart from conventional information systems is that rarely is one piece of data or information in itself sufficient to provide management with all the answers and that it requires the introduction of the process of “analysis” and “thinking”.

After all, the keys to the future are not found through extrapolations, predictions or media gurus, but through patient, careful strategic work.

Make More Informed Decisions… Not Decisions in a Vacuum.

The purpose of CI is not to predict the future, but to identify what is likely to happen and to assist leaders to make better decisions about the organisation’s future.

Competitive Intelligence is an integral part of making business decisions today. The data and information gathering and evaluating process can identify and project strategies that current or emerging customers and competitors might pursue, and provides an assessment of the implication of these strategies on your company’s future.

This process is very specific in its intent and always outward looking, using both internal and external resources as mentioned above.

We need to realize that we are threatening the very existence of our organization if we continue to make decisions in a vacuum. We need to realize that our more wide-awake competitors will climb on the ‘intelligence bandwagon’ even if we don’t. We need to realize that we have exciting new ways to protect margins, to fight the competition, to achieve breakthroughs. We need to realize the positives will far outweigh the negatives – but only if we change.

Forced change is always second prize. The secret lies in putting together a strategy for the future based on sound insights.

Here is an example of one CI project –
CASE STUDY

Scanning strategic environments and market segment prospects

Aardvark had a problem, perhaps many problems. The market for widgets seemed to be changing, revenue and premiums were under pressure in their key market segments. New market entrants and Aardvark’s main competitor were eroding market shares. New business models fueled by information and telco technology and movements in the exchange rate also seemed to be complicating the picture. What was going on, what was driving this turbulence? How would Aardvark respond? How could they improve their competitive advantage?

MindShifts worked with Aardvark to define the key intelligence topics and refine the key questions which would drive a situational analysis. Internal sources of information, expertise and networks across the organisation were mined. At the same time MindShifts carried out a targeted search for publicly available information which would add external information to the analysis. We also talked to industry commentators and associations, suppliers, competitors and employees in search of information and knowledge.

The strategic drivers were now becoming clear, the market and competitive terrain had fundamentally shifted and Aardvark now appeared to be positioned in the wrong place to take optimal advantage from this powerful set of trends. On the basis of this analysis, MindShifts proposed strategies that would move Aardvark to take advantage of the emerging opportunities.

Working with MindShifts, Aardvark was able to move quickly to modify its capability and move into emerging market segments through a new distribution channel with the right sort of product and service offer. Within 12 months Aardvark had reversed the erosion in market share and was also experiencing strong growth in the new market segments they had entered. Aardvark’s market entry was also before its major traditional competitor which was proving to be a significant advantage as they now tried to play catch up.

For more information about how we can assist you to develop CI capability in your organisation contact Babette Bensoussan at MindShifts.

Overcoming Fear

What Are You Afraid Of?

Are you pursing the goals that matter most to you?
Are you satisfied with your level of success?
Are you glad to be where you are in life?
Are you playing YOUR own game or are you playing someone else’s game?

Everything seems hard. We are all busy and we are all tired. We all don’t have enough money. We all know someone who says we can’t or that we would never make it. And then we are worried with what comes next. Are these excuses familiar to you?

What about these:

• Fear of change
• Fear of failure
• Fear of not being good enough
• Waiting for something to happen
• Perfectionism
• Being overwhelmed with all that you have to do
• Not know how

Well guess what – there is a battle going on….. and it is between your ears!!

Don’t surrender. While your fears may be real they are not good enough reasons for inaction. Your biggest work is in front of you and it has to do with how well you lead your life – how good are you at self-leadership?

Understanding Energy Leadership is in my opinion the missing link or secret ingredient to making all the methodologies you’ve tried and tossed aside about leadership, work — the petrol in the engine, the currency that fuels your success. Today let’s focus on energy itself. What is this mysterious quality? It’s not just movement or activity, sometimes it is stillness and reflection. Some call it a vitality or force. Energy gives us the capability to differentiate ourselves from another. Energy gives us the physical ability and drive to win the marathon — not in the first 25 miles — but in the last mile, when it is so easy to give up.

Energy can be conserved, stored, stockpiled, transformed, leaked and shared. In life we get energy from an amazing array of fuels. We can use this power to grow and develop, use our senses well, attract and repel other energy.

Now let’s look at leadership. Interestingly each of us leads by choice or default. The question is not whether you are a leader but how well you purpose to lead. To lead well takes awareness of your energy and a willingness to learn ways to use it better. Your body is a perfect example of an energy system. It’s self-contained, self-governed and thought-affected. Each thought you have contributes a specific energy pattern to the energy within and around you. There are no idle thoughts. Your energy encompasses every thought, feeling, and emotion you’ve had today, as well as, your recent actions. Because thoughts create energy in their own likeness – some can injure and others heal.

Energy Leadership Coaching is designed to reveal and develop your personally-effective style of leadership energy. This energy will positively influence and change not only you, but your family members, friends and everyone you work with and meet each day.

Albert Einstein is reputed to have said: “Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is physics.”

Well, regardless of who said this, I know that energy is also the secret power of great leadership. Once you understand how you create your reality and attract the things you do in your life, you can create the life you really want. Where to start? Here are some tips about how to overcome fear, and any excuses you may have.

  1. Identify your goal and embrace it. Use this question as a start. What do you want the change to look like? How will that give your life meaning? Think about it – even go for a walk to reflect on it.
  2. Create the space – even a small space (or time) to make a change.
  3. Be accountable to someone while surrounding yourself with others making similar changes themselves.
  4. Take small steps that will move you forward. Movement begets movement. Now take another small step…… and change is created. It is time to decide what you intend to do next and what the next few years will mean to you.

I feel this is so important that for the month of September only I am offering a 20% discount on all my coaching programs when booked. Get in touch today to find out more about Energy Leadership and our one-to-one coaching programs.

Self Love Coaching

Do You Love Yourself? | MindShifts | Energy Leadership

Over the years working on myself and coaching executives, I have learnt a little secret that I wanted to share with you.  It is quite simple – You can only love others as much as you love yourself.  Surprisingly simple yet so profound.  Just think about it.  You can only give to others, what you give to yourself.  Turning that on its head, what you give to yourself is in fact what you draw to yourself.

Wayne Dwyer said it so beautifully :

“Make a pact to remind yourself often of this secret of not being able to give away anything you don’t have. Then work on your personal program of self-love, self-respect, and self-empowerment, and create a huge inventory of what you wish to give away.

One of the lessons I continue to learn and practice is that the universe responds with the same energy that we send out. If you attract a lot of people who wish to take advantage of you, you need to consider what you’re doing to attract victimizers into your life. If you run into anger a lot, explore the angry thoughts you have inside you. If your consciousness is a “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!” energy, you’ll attract all manner of demanding energies into your life. You know if this is true by the number of deadlines not being met, demanding bosses or customers you encounter, and the feeling of being a victim. Send out “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!” energy to the universe, and it will do the same in return.

If what you give is self-respect and self-love, the universe, via the attractor energy, will return the love and respect you’ve been radiating. It’s really so simple. You can’t give away what you don’t have.”

Energy Leadership Index & Life Coaching

If you are interested to learn how victim thinking or negative thoughts might be impacting your life, your work and your relationships with others, get in touch to discuss our coaching programs and the Energy Leadership Index.

 

Are you Future Ready?

How to become future ready

As a competitive intelligence practitioner – what does it mean to be future ready?

If I look at this question from a competitive intelligence (CI) perspective my response must provide options for actions for being future ready. So where to start?

Let me start with the original question itself.

  1. Does the question relate to individual future readiness or organisational future readiness?
  2. What are some critical uncertainties around the future that would impact anyone’s readiness?
  3. What are the assumptions or biases inherent in the question?

This means I need to be clear about these factors and any others facing the decision-maker before I drive through the plethora of information. And, talking about the plethora of information…. It is not just the information that is available on the internet or has been published that is important. When it comes to the future, it is vitally important to talk to people.

Yes, I know you can ask people on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for answers however I wonder how many people would really be capable of providing insightful comments to such a question?

This means we need to go out and seek answers from people who may have an idea of what any plausible future will look like.

From an organisational perspective, that could mean talking to academics, journalists, futurists, customers, suppliers, distributors to just name a few. Many of them may not have published their future intentions on the internet for you to find via a single simple search on Google! So let’s say I now have a lot of information at hand and am well informed about an array of possible futures. Does that make me future ready?

In my opinion, absolutely not! It does not answer either ‘so what does this all mean for me?’ nor does it tell me ‘now what should I be doing?’

We need to analyse the information in light of our current situation. Based on over 25 years of business experience, this is without a doubt one of the weakest steps that managers and individuals face. Analysis is the cornerstone for insights yet far too often we see summaries instead!! From an organisations perspective all the information needs to be analysed in context of the organisation’s capabilities, strengths, weaknesses, etc to identify the gaps it needs to address to be future ready, irrespective of the future that plays out.

Some suggested analytical techniques that would help here would include techniques such as

  • Scenario Analysis
  • Critical Success Factors
  • Driving Forces Analysis
  • even SWOT (done properly mind you – not the silly little four boxes!!).

Conducting a SWOT would be equally valid for an individual. The output of these techniques would identify options, opportunities, and threats that an organisation or individual could address to make itself future ready.

This approach would provide real insight, and outlines what should be done to best prepare for the future. To be future ready for me is not just about knowing what future may likely play out but about being prepared and alert to meet any future with the best possible advantage. What do you think?

If you would like assistance to become future readyget in touch with MindShifts.

Babette Bensoussan is the CEO and founder of MindShifts and was appointed a Fellow of SCIP (Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals). In 2006, she was the recipient of the SCIP Meritorious Award, which is the most prestigious award within the international CI community. As a qualified counsellor and MBTI practitioner, with certification as a business coach through the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching in the U.S.A, Babette is well placed to assist executives and organisations to improve their future performance and success both personally and professionally.

 

Why do Smart companies make dumb business decisions

Why do smart companies make dumb business decisions?

Why do smart companies make dumb business decisions?  Like you, I have heard many stories of great companies crashing.  But why is that?

After 25 years of strategy consulting, I would like to suggest some of the following reasons:

  • Companies repeat mistakes
  • Work gets duplicated
  • Customer relations are strained
  • Good ideas don’t get shared
  • Competition is around price
  • Not keeping up with market leaders or innovators
  • Dependence on a few key individuals
  • Slow to innovate
  • Lack of good market knowledge

People don’t choose for good things to go bad – just as executives don’t choose strategies that fail.

Bottom line I think, is that people in business aren’t finding the insights they need to improve their decision-making, aren’t sharing it around if they do know something, aren’t keeping it refreshed and up to date, nor even using it.

All of this has real business consequences.

What do you think you could do differently this month to improve the quality of your decisions?

Get in touch to find out how MindShifts can help you make better business decisions.

 

Better Business Decisions Workshop

 

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When I look at me, who do I see?

My wonderful colleague Jack Speer from Delta Associates http://delta-associates.com wrote this wonderful post. I just had to share it with you. It is about how you really see yourself when you look in the mirror.

Are you happy or horrified? What is your self concept when you look at yourself? Some people can’t get enough of their own face in the mirror, others avoid looking at all. Where do you sit?

As an executive coach one of the most important aspects of coaching is working on what a person sees when they see themselves—their fundamental self-concept. You have to get self-concept right for anything else to be right. The ”Me” in the mirror is fundamentally a reflection of how you perceive life. What you see will literally be what you get in your life.

The health of your self-concept is almost as important as your physical health. It is so fundamental and foundational that no matter how smart you are, how many degrees you’ve earned, your work experience—self concept trumps everything else. To a great extent your self-concept will determine your station in life, your wealth, your happiness and well-being.

Do You Accept False information about Yourself—Why!?

My father was not a self-disclosing person, so it surprised me one day when I was a teenager when he told me that he would have been happier and more successful in life if he hadn’t been so ugly. Nothing could have been farther from the truth as revealed by his childhood photos. Later in middle age, he was a very good-looking and distinguished man. He simply accepted false information that he was given about himself.

You may be carrying around false information that was given you very young, and you still believe it.

The Wrong Kind of Humility Can Ruin Your Life—Stop It!

Religious upbringing, parents, and culture have a lot to say about how you’re likely to see yourself. I grew up hearing sermons about being humble, and my West Texas parents told me and my brother over and over again—”don’t get the big head.” If I had ever told my parents I wanted to grow up rich and famous, they would have sat me down for a good talking to. It was out of the world view of my West Texas relatives. The opposite of humble is not really haughty. It’s a belief in yourself to be self-confident and to serve those around you.

Change Ideas that Will Change Your Life—If You’ll Do Them!

Here are some thoughts for you every day when you look in the mirror—they will change your life, but not all at once—changing your self-concept is as difficult as anything you’ll ever do. So here it is . . .

 1. Be true to you–your very own guru. When you look into the mirror, you’re seeing in you a unique individual, never ever to be repeated in the history of the world. There are many guides and sources of knowledge and inspiration—but you are the only one capable of evaluating what you receive, and making the final decision.

People spend a lifetime looking in the mirror and trying to dress, speak, and style themselves like someone they have seen and admired. What they say is what they think people want them to say. When they walk into a room, they wonder who they should try to be.

You certainly must remember you’re not God nor Superman. At the same time, you must trust yourself ultimately. It doesn’t mean you have to abandon your belief, faith, or respect for authority—nothing further from my point. It simply means that you are the last word. Otherwise, you run the risk of drinking someone else’s Kool-Aid—not healthy!

2. Be your own hero—There is no one else you should admire more. When I became my own hero people around me began to look at me differently—like a leader they depended on. Previously, nobody ever beat up on me and put me down like I put down myself. When I was victim of my bad self-concept, everyone responded to me accordingly. Every time I tried to take a role of leadership, I got the feeling that people were saying, “Who do you think you are?” The reason they responded that way was I didn’t believe in who I was. When I believed in myself, others believed in me.

3. Don’t let anyone put you down or limit you because of physical appearance—there’s no “Leaders Look”. At 5’8” inches, I’m getting shorter every year as people grow taller. I go to the gym several times a week and pass by young people who are anywhere from 6’5” up to approaching 7 feet. I am a dwarf compared to these people. Yet short people are doing some really tall things. One of my favourite personalities is Meet the Press host, Chuck Todd, 5’3”, who beat out a lot of very tall people for that position. So if there is something about your physical appearance that you can do something about, work to change it, certainly. But short, tall, fat, homely people who believe in themselves are achieving huge accomplishments every day.

4. Develop your own style that works for you. Leaders come in all kinds of wrappings. I have also known leaders who are incredibly shy, physically unappealing, take-charge people, don’t make any waves folks, sharp elbowed, aggressive personalities, quiet, talkative—all who were successful within their own styles. These people see themselves as leaders and when they walk into a room people often ask, why? It is because of their own self-concept and belief in themselves. Every day you are auditioning for the leading role in the greatest movie of all—the stage play about your life. As the star of that play, you don’t want to walk out on the stage, forget your lines, and fall on your face. It’s not easy to be a star, but you’re in that role. Play that role to the hilt. It’s worth the performance.

 

Find out how you can improve your self-concept. Get in touch for a complimentary coaching session – click here.

Self Care - Put your oxygen mask on first!

Are you looking after yourself?

I have been coaching now for some time and one of the things I have noticed is that many people don’t take care of themselves first.

This always reminds me of the announcement on planes – put your own oxygen mask on first before helping others. If we don’t take care of ourselves first, how can we be authentic in assisting and advising others?

I love the way so many people give advice freely yet are really saying – do as I say not as I do!! So how good are you at self care?

I came across these great questions in a recent Mind Movies Newsletter that might help you become a little better or more aware of self care that might shift your mindset:

1. What am I not saying, that needs to be said?
2. Do I feel unheard or left out?
3. What fear am I afraid to face?
4. Am I holding onto resentment or guilt?
5. Do I have an abundance mindset?
6. Do my everyday choices bring me long-term fulfilment or simply instant gratification?
7. Do I use situations to grow and evolve or to beat myself up?
8. Have I said something gentle and loving to myself in the last hour or even day?
9. Am I appreciative of all the things in my life?
10. So what does self-care really mean for me?

Self care sometimes means taking a deep, long breath. Sometimes it’s just shutting down your computer. Sometimes it’s a good cry and other times it’s going deeper into your core and facing your fears. For me this week, my self-care practice involved quiet reflection while walking along the beach.

Hopefully asking yourself these 10 questions might result in a healthier and happier you.

BEFORE YOU SPEAK…..THINK
T= Is it True?
H= Is it Helpful?
I= Is it Inspiring?
N= Is it Necessary?
K= Is it Kind?

For more information on MindShifts Coaching and Mentoring Programs please click here, or get in touch today.

7 Deadly Sins of Business Decision Making

7 DEADLY SINS OF BUSINESS DECISION-MAKING

As many of you who will have read my June Monday Motivation will know I have been going through some old files. What memories! However they also reminded me of how often the basics of business still remain unchanged. And one such area is in the way we make business decisions. Why is it that so many companies keep making costly mistakes?

The reasons business people make the wrong decisions, in fact, stems from a multiplicity of causes. A colleague of mine, Deborah Sawyer, a number of years ago identified seven deadly sins of business decision-making that alas are too familiar to us all.

Her list included:

1. We already have all the answers – the longer someone has worked in an industry the more inclined they are to believe they know all the answers about that industry. The same applies for someone who has worked with a particular company for a while and is immersed in that particular company’s viewpoint.

Symptoms include –
a) familiarity breeds contempt;
b) arrogance in that we would never go outside for information – we have it all in-house!
c) “old boy’s knowledge”.

REMEMBER: History does not always repeat itself!

2. Asking the wrong question – getting to the right decision means having the right information. And having the right information means asking the right questions. Here lies the kernel of another reason why many business people make the wrong decisions – they do not ask the right question.

REMEMBER: Asking the wrong quesiton is not such a sin if a company is willing to recognise the mistake, backtrack and then go forward.

3. Old Demon Ego– Decisions which companies should never take, and would never take if egos could be set aside, do get taken because decision-makers can’t give up their pet ideas. Whilst decision makers often know they should go and get some objective input to test their idea, they deliberately avoid doing so. That’s becuase they know an input of information will likely show up the flaws in the project. That would mean they would have to abandon the idea!

Symptoms include:
a) unwise acquisitions
b) diversification bites
c) failing overseas
d) entrepreneurial weakness

Have you hugged your pet idea today?

4. Flying by the Seat of your Pants Saves Money – Doesn’t It? – Executives often fall for this one! By not seeking out the information to support decision making, they “save” the company money.

Symptoms include:
a) winging it overseas
b) rushing with a product lauch/project
c) leaving it too late

It is important to remember here that most readily available information is generalised and intended to inform in a general way. Rarely is generalised information, which just about anyone can access, tailored enough to support business decision making, which has to occur in the context of a paritcular company’s situation.

5. If It Works for Them, It’ll Work for Us (All Aboard the Bandwagon)– Rather than undertake soul searching to find the right choices, a company instead looks around at what others in its industry have done and simply mimics them. By imitating what others do, there is no need to take an idea and test it in the context of your own company to see if there is a fit.

Some symptoms include:
a) following the fashions
b) safety in numbers
c) why is no-one else doing this?

This sin is most usually made in mature industries where there are a limited number of players and everyone knows everyone else.

6. Hear No Evil – Another way companies avoid making the right decision is by making sure they never hear anything unpleasant. We all know this one and some of the symptoms include:
a) don’t tell me what I ask to hear!
b) shoot the messenger

7. No Decision Can be the Same as a Bad Decision (Hurry Up and Wait) – Failure to make a deicison does not just mean a lost opportunity. It can also take away the chance to take corrective action to an existing business situation.

Symptoms include:
a) decision drag (also known as procrastination)
b) head in the sand
c) eye off the future

Do you recognise any of these in your business? Every company and every industry runs the risk of thinking that the current status quo will continue. Many decisions taken or not taken rest on this assumption.

So which sins are we committing today as we work to being a more profitable business?

Get in touch find out how MindShifts can assist you and your organisation to make better decisions. Take action today!

10 Essential Strategic Insights

I was recently going through some old files and realised that in some cases the more things change, the more they really stay the same. This is especially true in strategy and when you distil the writings of Michael Porter, a global authority on competition and strategy, there are essentially 10 key strategic insights. Not least among them is that most companies think they have strategy when they don’t.

Porter’s essential strategic insights are:

1. The granddaddy of all mistakes is competing to be the best, going down the same path as everybody else and thinking that somehow you can achieve better results.

2. Confusing marketing with strategy.

3. Overestimating strengths.

4. Getting the definition of the business wrong or getting the geographic scope wrong.

5. The Worst mistake: Not Having a Strategy at all.

6. Not addressing the hidden biases embedded in internal systems, organizational structures and decision-making processes.

7. Companies undermine their own strategies.

8. Strategy killers in the external environment.

9. If you listen to every customer and do what they want you to do, you can’t have a strategy.

10. Single minded pursuit of shareholder value, measured over the short term, has been enormously destructive for strategy and value creation.

Yes, some of these seem self-evident when you think about it, yet they run counter to the way most executives think and behave.

Clearly developing an effective strategy is a long-term process and not a short-term one, and having a strategy is even more important in these turbulent and uncertain times.

Remember we operate today in a VUCA World (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous). There is nothing wrong in returning to basics – sometimes it’s important to step back and take an outsiders view of your business.

Need to see with a fresh set of eyes? Looking for someone to challenge your thinking? – Give me a call on 0403 346 322 or contact us via our website.

Opportunity Everywhere

Opportunities Everywhere!

Think about the word “problem”.

This word actually produces stress because we feel we must solve something, it’s likely to be complicated, and somehow we’ll be graded on how we solve the problem.

The word “challenge”, although a vast improvement over the word “problem”, still carries hidden emotional baggage.

It comes with feelings that maybe you’ll be “humiliated” if your performance isn’t equal to others or you’ll have to climb over a great obstacle or run a tiring race.

The words “problem” and “challenge” are emotive words, meaning there are feelings and emotions that accompany them. Most of the time we’re unaware of these emotions as the words are so common.

When you see a challenge you naturally begin to see reasons why it can’t be achieved. When you see a problem, you see failure looming. With both, you’re recognising a manifestation of a fear you have. Once you’re victim to the fear of failure you can’t think in a healthy way.

The answer? Change your perspective.

What if there was no such thing as problems or challenges?

What if there were only opportunities to test what you believed, no failures to keep you from trying, and only growth from your experiences?

“What would you attempt to do today if you knew you could not fail?”

There’s huge power in this kind of thinking! (Which is another good reason to have an objective coach in your life.) Changing your perspective –just the way you use a word for example – helps you tap into an inner energy to accomplish your dreams. Changing your perspective helps you identify and overcome internal obstacles and barriers so you can succeed!

For more information on MindShifts Coaching and Mentoring Programs please click here, or get in touch today.

Positive Energy

Creating Positive Energy With Your Words

One of the ways we generate energy is as a result of the words we use. Every word spoken or read creates an image and energy in our minds.

Did you know that we actually remember positive words better than negative words!

Here’s an example: Don’t dump rubbish here! Sounds OK. It communicates! But in your mind something amazing happens when you read this – amazing but not good. Why not good? Well, when you read an instruction that is worded negatively, you have to switch tracks from “I can’t dump rubbish here” to “where in the world AM I supposed to dump the rubbish!”

What’s better and more effective to say is: “Dump rubbish here.”

Eliminating one word turns the negative order into a positive order that can be easily followed and avoids having to switch around in a thought dilemma, which wastes time and creates negative energy!

Here are a couple more to consider:

 

So think carefully about the words you use and the positive energy they bring to you and to those around you.

This month, practice using positive words and let me know how you go. You could always share how you are going on the MindShifts Facebook page.

INTELLIGENT COMPETITION

The most critical strategic issue for any business is its competitiveness. No one would disagree with this yet few businesses really spend time and effort to deeply understand and manage their future competitiveness.

Most executives monitor their competitiveness through market share and as we all know that indicator is historical and is in no way predictive.  Neither is historical tracking of past revenue trends.

So how do you monitor your competitiveness, identify potential new entrants, understand your existing competitors, and manage as well as identify your potential competitiveness? How do you manage the risks involved in being in a competitive market?

 

While generally the CEO is the one responsible for the competitive ability of any business, they are often lacking the right insights to make the best decisions.  And while most businesses have plenty of information and plenty of know-how they have very little Competitive Insights or Intelligence (CI).  One reason — there is no tie between business strategy and future competitiveness, and business systems and processes.

CI is concerned with the methods, systems and processes that a business uses to monitor its competition, any potential industry disruption, its own competitive position, and to improve its competitiveness overall.

Although most managers intuitively carry out some form of CI – generally in an ad-hoc way – the overwhelming data that is available, rapidly changing technology, and increasing global competitive pressures mean that there is an increasing need to develop more systematic ways of doing CI.

 

There are a number of key steps that will ensure the success of a good CI process. These are:

 

  1. Ask the right question

 

Far too often, businesses make decisions too quickly and without a strategic context — it is a case of ‘ready, fire, aim’.  The internet and social media has not helped this mindset, as the speed to market has become a more critical factor. In the end, we are left with a smoking gun, but where did the bullet go?

 Experience has shown that ‘asking the right question’ is one of the hardest steps for senior management.  Here we need to define the decision objective or purpose and to put it simply to understand what really needs to be identified.

 

  1. Manage information effectively

 

Once you have identified your objective and possible key questions, the next driver for understanding what you have and don’t have within the business needs to come from studying the forces at work on your business. These forces could include competitors, technology, clients, consumers, new entrants, industry trends and so on.

Getting solid information on the decision at hand requires a number of information sources:

Human sources: for example, people in your organisation, business networks, experts, etc.

Economic and financial sources: for example industry reports, economic analyses specialist media.

Corporate sources:  for example, customers, suppliers.

Technical sources: for example technical reports, academic papers, and product manuals.

Remember all the information needs to be put into context and subjected to interpretation to derive some meaning and value.

 

  1. Analyse for insight and intelligence

 

The major focus in the CI process is the method of analysis used to turn the information collected into intelligence or insights for the decision maker. It is only through analysis that intelligence or insight is created.

The value of insight is early awareness, as it enables you to recognise and monitor the future as it unfolds, thereby reducing risk and minimising mistakes. Today, executives are faced with many pressures — they may sometimes seek only short-term gains — but costly mistakes from executives making uninformed decisions are no longer an option.  The risks are too high.

 

 It is important to note that the purpose of CI is not to predict the future, but to enable management to make better decisions about the future.

 

In a VUCA world, CI is becoming an integral part of making business decisions. The data and information gathering and evaluating process can identify and project strategies that current or emerging customers and competitors might pursue, and provides an assessment of the implication of these strategies on your company’s future competitiveness.

We need to realise that we have exciting new ways to protect margins, to fight the competition, to achieve breakthroughs. We need to realise the positives will far outweigh the negatives – but only if we change.

 

Forced change is always second prize. The secret lies in putting together a strategy for the future based on sound intelligence.

Are your beliefs creating the life you want?

Beliefs are thoughts in our heads that influence our emotions, behaviours, attitudes, and actions. Some beliefs can be empowering, which can lead us to great success, or self limiting which stops us from achieving our goals.

However, we need to be cognisant that beliefs are only thoughts and that they are not real. With the power of choice we can change our thoughts whenever we want to. We have the power to choose what we want to believe and not believe. Successful people have chosen to believe in thoughts that empower them. What are you going to choose?

Here are some empowering beliefs that I have come across:

  1. I am not afraid, only excited for what is ahead
  2. I am responsible for the life I create – The choices I make are ultimately my own responsibility.
  3. Failure means nothing to me – I look for outcomes and if the outcomes are not what I expect, then I assess what I need to do to change those outcomes
  4. I embrace challenges because I will always find a way to overcome
  5. I am the person who has to decide. Whether I will do it or toss it aside; I am the person who makes up my mind.
  6. Vulnerability is the birthplace of love, joy, courage, creativity and empathy. Vulnerability gives me strength and fuels my belief in me.
  7. The past was who I was, the present is who I am and the future is who I may become.
  8. I am on a continuous journey of learning, which will never end.
  9. I accept that sometimes I can stuff up, make mistakes and that I am not perfect however I never stop trying to be the best person I can be.
  10. I always dream big. I strive for that which is out of my reach as the impossible is worth striving for.

One of my favourite quotes is from Lao Tzu –

Watch your thoughts, they become words
Watch your words, they become actions
Watch your actions, they become habits
Watch your habits, they become character
Watch your character, it becomes your destiny.

Do you want to change some of your thoughts?

The first step to changing how you think is to decide what the results are when you act on your existing beliefs.

Don’t worry at this stage whether your beliefs are right or wrong. Just stop and question: What are your key beliefs about yourself and your life now? What are the consequences of those beliefs in your life today? How do these thoughts serve you?

Now for the next 10 days choose one empowering belief and repeat it three times a day – preferably looking at yourself in a mirror. Each day try to behave and act in a way that supports the thought that you have chosen. Then watch how you begin to feel different and begin to transform.

Once you commit to living your life as an empowered individual you will have no option but to experience a life full of success and fulfilment.

Why wouldn’t you?

Let me help you bust those self-limiting beliefs, send me an email today at action@52.62.165.177.

Monday Motivation – Let me be your Jiminy Cricket!

When Jiminy Cricket first came to media attention for his supporting role in a movie called Pinocchio in the 1940s, few realised the significance of this little green, talking insect with umbrella and top hat.

To me, he represents the essence of my coaching philosophy.

Goal Setting

First he teaches you to sing (or hum), “When You Wish Upon A Star” where you effortlessly learn the secret to goal setting…that reaching your own star is how you fulfil your life best.

The hardest part is selecting only one star to reach for. Until you know what you want, you’ll never know if you’ve satisfied your goal.

Right & Wrong

Additionally, Jiminy as coach represents a “conscience booster” to help you identify the right from wrong decisions which will lead to your success. Your coach becomes a trusted and faithful guide along the way – so you stay on the straight and narrow.

No Easy Answers
No coach will give you the answers as to what’s right or wrong. Instead, they’ll ask clarifying questions to help you identify what contributes or distracts from you achieving your vision. The choice is up to you.

This conscience/coach is available to help you when it seems you can’t stay focused. They offer words of encouragement and challenge so you can resist temptation. They suggest and support your choices to keep you on the straight and narrow path, pre-defined by you.

I’m proud to say I’m a coach like Jiminy Cricket.

Get in touch today to see how I can help you achieve your goals – email me at babette@52.62.165.177.

How to do SWOT Analysis the right way!

SWOT – The most abused analytical technique in management

As most business people would know SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.

Traditional SWOT analysis is possibly the most widely known and among the most utilized means of situation analysis.  A SWOT analysis is used to assess the fit between a company’s internal resources and capabilities (its strengths and weaknesses) and external possibilities (its opportunities and threats).

The technique can be applied to many areas of a company, including products, divisions, and services. The simplicity and ease of using this model have made it a popular technique, particularly for determining a company’s ability to deal with its environment.

However, it is also arguably the most misused, misapplied, abused and poorly understood analysis method in management today.

Have a look at the diagram below.

Most people undertake the first SWOT that, to be honest, provides executives with little insight and no options as to their competitive abilities. It is so easy to fill in four boxes and persuade yourself you have done analysis!

The real SWOT (as originally developed by Harvard Professor Ken Andrews) will always deliver insights and options for good decision making. It is a little harder to do however every client I have worked with using this “proper” SWOT has uncovered invaluable insights and options as to its competitive ability.

SWOT Analysis

So how can you improve your use of SWOT Analysis?

Step 1: The first step in utilizing a SWOT analysis to understand each of the elements.

a. Strengths: Strengths are those factors that make an organization more competitive than its marketplace peers. In other words, those factors that differentiate you from your competitors. It is where the company has a distinctive advantage at doing or what resources it has which are superior to the competition. Listing what you believe are your strengths is simply an exercise in patting yourself on the back! Strengths are what differentiates you from your competitors. Your customers, suppliers and third parties know your strengths well compared to your competitors.

b. Weaknesses: A weakness is a limitation, fault or defect within the company that can prevent it from achieving its objectives. They occur when the company performs poorly or has inferior capabilities or resources compared to the competition. Again, your customers, suppliers, and other third parties would be aware of your real weaknesses.

c. Opportunities: Opportunities include any favorable current or prospective situation in a company’s environment such as a trend, change or overlooked need, which supports the demand for a product or service and permits a company to enhance its competitive position. Opportunities are equally valid for all players in your industry – not just you!

d. Threats: A threat includes any unfavorable situation, trend or impending change in a company’s environment that is currently or potentially damaging or threatening to its ability to compete. It may be a barrier, constraint, or anything that might inflict problems, damages, harm or injury to the organization. Again, these threats are equally valid for all the players in your industry.

Once you have completed your list in each of the four boxes, the hard work now begins.

Step 2: You now need to match each of the boxes with possible strategies you could undertake –

a. Matching your Strengths and market/industry Opportunities – what are some activities/strategies you could develop?

b. Matching your Weaknesses and market/industry Opportunities – what are some activities/strategies you could develop?

c. Matching your Strengths and market/industry Threats – what are some activities/strategies you could develop?

d. Matching your Weaknesses and market/industry Threats – what are some activities/strategies you could develop?

This is not easy to do and requires thinking.

Below is an example of a completed SWOT.

Once you have completed your SWOT, you will notice some common themes in the activities/strategies you have available. These common themes become what I call your strategic imperatives. You should address these in the coming 12 months as they will provide you with a competitive ability based on your current market fit.

Each year, business executives need to repeat this process as your fit will no longer be the same – and neither will your marketplace!

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Better Business Decisions Workshop

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EXAMPLE:   SWOT Analysis for Cannondale Bicycle Corporation

Competitive Insights

Are you reading the signals that will save your business?

As we move into 2018, I am getting requests from colleagues and businesses about the need to ensure that they understand their competitive environment and that they are clear on the focus of their strategy for 2018.

The problem that I often encounter is that most business strategies are generally ideas blowing in the wind without much competitive insight or analysis. You know what I mean – our strategy is to grow our business by 10% (or whatever other figure your CEO/Board has in mind) or to increase our customer relationships or improve our interaction with customers, and so on without much input from the competitive landscape!

So for those who believe that they really know their market – which competitor or new entrant is breathing down your neck to also deliver similar growth and/or improve customer interactions???? How are you going to differentiate your business? Maybe there is a business out there – in Never Never Land that just might make your business redundant!!

Nothing happens to you or your business in a vacuum…..there are always signals.

So here is my tip to all my wonderful readers, after 25 years as a competitive intelligence expert, author, strategic consultant, with over 350 client projects under my belt…….

Develop your analytical skills.

Make sure you have at least one analytical technique you can use in each of the following categories:

  1. Environmental
  2. Evolutionary
  3. Strategic
  4. Corporate/Competitors
  5. Customer
  6. Financial

And by the way, SWOT only sits in one of those categories. More on that in my forthcoming newsletter.

If you want to learn more about different analytical techniques have a look at: http://52.62.165.177/~mindshifts/ms/resources/babettes-books/

Or give me a call….(02) 94113900

 

Special Offer: I’d like to offer you a complimentary 30 minute strategy coaching session to help you work out which analysis frameworks would help you most in your business.

Click here to book a time that suits you.

Personal Planner

What’s your personal plan for 2018?

Most of us have a personal plan – of some kind. It might be a list of things that you’re ‘hoping’ to achieve… and sometimes you might have it ‘written down somewhere’.

After working with successful people for over 20 years as a business advisor and coach I know from experience that for a plan to be achievable it must be explicit and ‘alive’. Having a plan in your head just isn’t going to cut it.

By articulating and writing it out, you will become clearer on the outcomes that you want to achieve. Are you looking to develop your career, inject more fun and enjoyment into your days, enhance relationships, or get on top of your finances or health?

Having a written plan is the first step…

Here are some tips to get your personal plan started:

1. Pick a future point in time (maybe the end of the year, or in 3 – 5 years) and imagine your ideal life. What does it look like? What are you doing that is different from today?

Action: Download our wheel of life to help you with this process – and reflect on how you have addressed each area of your life at the point in time you have selected.

2. For each area of your life, write down what are you good at, what makes you happy, and what you could improve? Make a list of your strengths and the areas you need to address.

3. Choose one area to focus on. (If you try to focus on too many areas at once you may end up giving up.) Write down what your ultimate objective is – and the steps you need to take to achieve the ideal scenario you’ve described. How will you know if you have achieved your goal? Like any objective you need to make sure it’s measurable.

4. Get a support person or coach to keep you focused and accountable. As I often say, it is hard to keep focus when you are up to your armpit in alligators!

5. Once you feel you are moving forward in one area, you can begin to look at other parts of your life. Remember to set some clear milestones so you know that you are moving in the right direction.

Most people think that planning is confined to the office, and limited to finance and budgets. However to create the life that you want – you must plan for it. While there may be a budget somewhere in your plan, a major part of the process will involve taking the time to think, articulate and measure where you are now – where you want to go – and how and when you’re going to get there.

You create your life.

After all, you are the leader of your life.

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Special Offer: Over the next couple of months I’d like to offer you a complimentary 30 minute strategy coaching session to help you map out your personal plan for 2018. Together we can make it your best year yet!

Click here to book a time that suits you.

Do you see what you’re missing?

Over the last twelve months or so, we’ve been bombarded by talk of ‘Fake News’. Whether you call it ‘Fake News’, ‘Fake Intelligence’ or just plain old wrong information – it’s always been around.

When the market changes, we see opportunities and problems in a certain way – because of the solutions that we’re used to.

According to Seth Godin, when confronted with a patient with back pain, surgeons prescribed surgery. In the same scenario, physical therapists thought that therapy was required, and acupuncturists were sure that needles were the answer. Across the entire universe of patients, the single largest indicator of treatment wasn’t based on the symptoms a patient suffered – or the patients background, it was the background of the doctor.

The reason so many organisations have trouble dealing with new opportunities – and managing problems, is  that they approach it from the perspective they are used to. The odds are that they will continue to do so until their organisation fails. It’s not just about the new vs. the old. It’s from the background you view the new.

Ask yourself, how can your organisation see new opportunities and problems – and do you need to change perspective to see the right solutions? Are you really seeing your competitors without your blindspots?

Get in touch with MindShifts today to find out how we can help you see what you’re missing.

How to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the capacity to effectively perceive, express, understand and manage your emotions and the emotions of others in an effective and appropriate manner. Research has proven that EI is a strong predictor of success in the workplace, more so than IQ, skill sets, personality, and experience.

In essence, Emotional Intelligence equals Interpersonal Effectiveness, and the more effective you are with others, the more successful you’ll be.

Enhancing and developing a greater awareness and application of EI will have a significant impact in all aspects of your life, including more self-awareness and improved relationships with co-workers, friends, family, and others who are significant in your life. People who improve their EI capabilities are able to decrease stress – personally and professionally, enhance interpersonal relationships, and demonstrate greater leadership and decision-making skills. Even more important, raising EI has a direct and positive effect on your level of consciousness.

Here are a few tips on how to increase your Emotional Intelligence, taken from iPEC’s Energy Leadership Development SystemTM, a full coaching certification program which I undertook

  • Begin to take notice of how your thoughts affect your emotions, and how your emotions affect your actions. Self- awareness is the key to beginning to shift your energy and increase EI. As you go through your day, be aware of how you react to situations, and what thoughts are going through your head as you do so. If someone cuts you off on the road, and your thought is ‘What an idiot,’ your resulting emotion would be anger. If you think instead ‘Wow, he must really be in a rush to get someplace,” your emotion would most likely be very different. As you become more self-aware, you’ll be able to identify what triggers your emotions.
  • Journal about areas to improve in your awareness and expression of your emotions. What’s working, and what’s not working for you? What relationships need improvement?
  • Journal about ways to manage and control your emotions. What has been effective for you, and what hasn’t? How do you want to respond, and how can you do so?
  • Practice meditation/centring to be able to build a stronger tolerance to anxiety.
  • Each day, set your intention to be more aware of your thoughts/feelings and how they might affect you and/or others.
  • When you’re very angry or upset, give yourself 5-10 minutes alone, prior to taking any action. Then ask yourself what would be the best way to address the situation. Think about the energy level at which you’d like to respond. Taking a little break will help you respond as you’d like to, not just go with your “knee-jerk” reaction.
  • Seek out others who will assist you, objectively, in providing observations of how they experience you expressing and/or managing/controlling your emotions. You may be surprised at how others view you.
  • Tell others you want to increase your understanding of their thoughts and feelings and “check in” with them periodically about this. You’ll soon become better at reading others.
  • After getting a buy-in, offer feedback to those around you about their emotional awareness, expression, and management.
  • Practice incorporating new skills and behaviours and being aware of how others respond to you.
  • Interview others who demonstrate high EI, to learn some of their strategies for responding to stressful situations.
  • Take an Energy Leadership IndexTM Happy to debrief you on the report and we can work together on increasing your self understanding

THE POWER OF LISTENING

Many years ago I learned an invaluable life tip. One of my teachers always stressed how we have one mouth and two ears; and that listening is far more valuable than just talking.

Have you ever asked someone to do something and they nod their heads and “yes, yes” you only to have them return with a result only remotely related to what you asked for?

There are a number of reasons for this:  they may be distracted, you may be distracted, they may not understand what you’ve said, and/or are afraid or “too cool” to ask for clarity, or you may not have explained it well – all of these have to do with weak listening skills.

So what are some tips to help us all be better listeners?

  • One of Stephen Covey’s “7 Habits of Highly Effective People©” was to “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.” Put listening before talking, it’s the key to communication.
  • Let others know you’re listening by rephrasing what they’ve just said. It also confirms what you think you’ve heard.
  • Avoid putting words in someone’s mouth and never finish someone’s sentence (nothing is more annoying and rude!)
  • If you’re talking in a place that’s noisy or your phone keeps dropping out, be sure you clarify and confirm what you’ve heard rather than filling in the missing blanks yourself.
  • If you’re face-to-face with someone, maintain healthy eye contact!
  • Focus on what they’re saying. Multitasking is highly over-rated and some research has found it results in being about 40% less effective. Certainly this is true with listening. So don’t be watching for a text or ordering coffee while someone is explaining something. Stop and listen!
  • Let someone finish what they’re saying and learn the art of asking sensible, clarifying questions.

 

Communicating well takes skills in both talking AND listening. Major in listening and you will never go wrong!

Take some time to reflect on this month’s Motivation and how it might apply to you, and get in touch if we can help.

Ready – Fire – Aim, Australia’s Smoking Gun

Far too often, we come across organisations where decisions are made too quickly and without a strategic context. The old rule of “ready, fire, aim” is still prevalent in corporate Australia. The internet has not helped this thinking as the speed to market becomes a critical factor. In the end we are left with a smoking gun but where did the bullet go?

While information is more abundant than ever before, managers are intelligent information starved!

Competitive Intelligence (CI) has grown as a management discipline around the world as companies face tougher and faster competition. Competitive Intelligence in large successful multinational organisations is becoming a “must have” rather than a “nice to have”. In fact recent studies from the USA indicate that budgets for CI now range up to and over US$4 million per annum and that rates of return can be as high as 4000%.

In the past, Australian businesses have been slow to practise effective Competitive Intelligence. One reason we believe, is because they think it is something else, another buzzword, another soft option, another ‘be seen to do’ activity which consumes time and profit. Today, some are beginning to realise it is the opposite, a strict discipline that selects and delivers the right intelligence to support key decision-makers, a discipline focused on optimising time and profit. An example is one client who measures the value of business intelligence simply in dollars – an identified new market worth to them at around A$100 million.

Another reason why companies have been slow to pick it up, is that many Australian companies think they are already practising Competitive Intelligence. CI is not paper shuffling, having the most expensive database or the most efficient data distribution. CI is also not market research or strategic planning. It is an approach which focuses these and all marketing, analytical and planning functions on one outcome, maximising the company’s competitiveness.

So what is this CI discipline that helps you be “aim” first? Competitive Intelligence is concerned with the methods organisations use to monitor their competition, their own competitive position, and to improve their competitiveness. It is about the techniques used to select and filter information, to interpret and analyse it, to communicate it to the right people, and to use it effectively. Although all managers intuitively carry out some form of CI, the information explosion, changing technology, and increasing global competitive pressures mean that there is an increasing need to develop more systematic ways of using CI.

The major focus in the process is not just the identification of sources of information but what method of analysis will be used to turn the information into intelligence. There are over 170 methods of analysis in business and picking the appropriate methodology is critical to delivering value at the end. It is through analysis that intelligence is created.

The intelligence process works best however within a strategic framework where individuals and organisations can look ahead with all the means at their disposal, interpret what they find and integrate these understandings into a continuous cycle or process of competitive ability. The keys to the future are not found through extrapolations, predictions or media gurus, but through patient, careful strategic work. You need to be ready and take careful aim at the specific target before you fire.

A strategic plan that doesn’t include insight about the near future is next to useless. Yesterday’s information and methods are increasingly ineffective for making today’s decisions – and even less effective for identifying tomorrow’s opportunities, problems, and unknown competitors. The purpose is not to predict the future, but to make better decisions about the future.

The value of foresight is early awareness. This reality check enables you to recognize and monitor the future as it unfolds, thereby reducing risk and minimizing mistakes. Costly mistakes by managers firing from the hip, is no longer an option. The issue is often that managers today faced with so many pressures are unsure of the specific target sometimes seeking only short-term gains.

The systems for identifying these warning signs is totally different than yesterday’s methodology. For example, business respects and relies on traditional information. Statistics, facts, concrete data. This hard or secondary information is retrospective and most useful for quantifying what has occurred. But it is increasingly unreliable and inaccurate for revealing the future in a rapidly changing environment.

Another problem is that of asking the right questions. Experience has shown this to be one of the hardest steps for senior management.  The key is to ensure there is understanding of what the “intelligence customer” really wants, where they are coming from, and how the intelligence will be directly related to a management decision or course of action.

Too many times, intelligence projects fall over because of the poor identification and understanding of the key issue and its relationship to the business. If managers can’t identify the target, how can they be prepared to take aim and be successful?

Success comes from hard work and careful planning, and it does not come overnight. The realities of making this work means we need to understand the competitive landscape before we fire, and incorporate this understanding and insight for competitive management. How your organisation prepares its competitive gun, in essence, will provide you with either a strategic advantage — or kindle the demise of your organisation.

Today, Competitive Intelligence is not negotiable. Can you afford to fire first?

Who Is Your Competition?

  • Other organisations offering the same product or service now?
  • Other organisations offering similar products or services now?
  • Organisations that could offer the same or similar products or services in the future?
  • Organisations that could remove the need for a product or service?

So who is your competition really? This question seems so simple however a company that defines its competitive set too narrowly can miss disruptive attackers and high potential growth opportunities. Just take a look at Blockbuster, Nokia and Kodak. They were all market leaders who fell pray to either disruptive technology or market changes. How can your company avoid a similar fate?

Let me guide you:

1. Define your target/objective

Far too often, organisations make decisions too quickly and without a strategic context — it is a case of ‘ready, fire, aim’ The internet has not helped this mindset, as the speed to market has become a more critical factor. Understand what you are looking to maximise.

2. Ask the right question or questions

Experience has shown that ‘asking the right question’ is one of the hardest steps for management. The key here is to understand what your business really wants, and how the insights uncovered will directly relate to a management decision or course of action

3. Manage information effectively

The next driver for understanding what you have and don’t have within the business needs to come from studying the forces at work on your business’s competitive ability. These forces include competitors, technology, consumers, new entrants, industry trends and so on. Getting information on these forces is the first step in becoming knowledgeable about your competitive environment.

4. Analyse for insight and intelligence

A strategic plan that doesn’t include insight about the near future is truly next to useless. Yesterday’s information and methods are increasingly ineffective for making today’s decisions — and even less effective for identifying tomorrow’s opportunities, problems and unknown competitors.

The value of insight is early awareness, as it enables you to recognise and monitor the future as it unfolds, thereby reducing risk and minimising mistakes.

Today, managers are faced with many pressures — they may sometimes seek only short-term gains — but costly mistakes from managers making uninformed decisions are no longer an option.

 Today, competing effectively is not just understanding existing competitors and the current business environment. It is strategically about having a picture of what the future business environment will look like and addressing the questions I posed at the start.

How your business prepares for the future will provide you with either a strategic advantage — or the demise of your business. The most critical strategic issue for a business is its competitiveness.

Looking for a mentor in strategy and competition for you business or division? Give us a call (02) 9411 3900 or email us here!

How to Stop Being a People Pleaser: 7 Powerful Habits

When you get stuck in the habit of trying to please other people pretty much all the time then it can have a sneaky and negative effect.

Not only on you but also on the people around you.  Because as you try to please:

  • You put on a mask and try to guess what to do while getting anxious and stressed.
  • You sometimes feel taken advantage off by others who use your people pleasing habit and you often feel out of tune with what you yourself deep down want.
  • It can also have an unintended effect on other people as they may see through your mask, start to feel your inner discomfort and stress themselves and get confused or upset because they sense you are not being honest and straightforward with them.

So being a people pleaser is often an even worse choice that one may at first think.

But how can you change this behavior and break the habit?

This week I’d like to share 7 powerful insights and habits that have helped me with that.

1. Realize that with some people it isn’t about you and what you do (no matter what you do).

Some people just can’t be pleased. No matter what you do. Because it’s not about what you do or do not do. It’s about him or her.

By realizing this and how you in the end can’t get everyone to like you or avoid conflict no matter what you do, you can start to let go of this ineffective and damaging habit.

2. Learn how to say no.

It’s of course hard to say no.  But it is vital for you own happiness, stress-levels and for living the life you truly want.

Here are 5 things that have made it easier for me to say no more often:

  • Disarm and state your need. It’s easier for people to accept your no if you disarm them first. Do that by, for instance, saying that you’re flattered or that you appreciate the kind offer. Then add that you, for example, simply don’t have the time for doing what they want.
  • If they’re pushy, add how you feel. Say that you don’t feel that this offer is a good fit for your life right now. Or that you feel overwhelmed and very busy and so you cannot do whatever they want. Telling someone how you honestly feel can help them to understand your side of the issue better. And it’s also a lot harder to argue with how you feel rather than what you think.
  • Help out a bit. If possible, finish your reply with recommending someone that you think could help out or would be a better fit for what they need. I do this quite often when I feel I lack the knowledge or experience that a reader or a friend is looking for.
  • Remind yourself why it is important to sometimes say no: You teach people by how you behave. They learn about you and your boundaries from your behavior. So if you stand up for yourself and say no and are assertive about what you don’t want then people will start to pick up on that. And over time you’ll encounter fewer and fewer situations where someone tries to be pushy or steamroll you.
  • It’s OK to feel a bit guilty about saying no (but you don’t have to act on it). Just feel it and be with that feeling for a while. But at the same time know that it doesn’t mean that you have to act on it and say yes or do what they want you to do.

3. People don’t really care that much about what you say or do.

Holding yourself back in life and trying to act in a way that is pleasing to others can, in my experience, come from a belief that people care a great deal about what you say or do.

But the truth is that while you may be the main character in your own life and head you’re not that in other people’s lives.  Because here’s the thing: people have their hands full with thinking and worrying about their own lives. They have their heads full with thoughts about their kids, career, pets, hobbies, dreams and worries or thoughts about what others may think of them.

This realization can make you feel less important. But it can also set you free.

4. Learn how to handle criticism and verbal lash outs (and the fear of that).

Sometimes it’s simply about the other person and his or her situation in life right now and not about what you did or did not do.  A few more things that help me to handle negative or critical messages are:

  • Wait before you reply. Take a couple of deep breaths in a conversation or a few minutes if you’re in front of your inbox. By doing so you’ll reduce the risk of lashing out yourself or making a mistake. Calming yourself down a bit before replying is pretty much always a good idea.
  • Remember: you can let it go. You don’t have to reply to all the negative messages you may get via email, social media or in real life. You can just say nothing, let it go and move on. This does of course not work in every situation but it’s important to remember that you from time to time do have this option.
  • It’s OK to disagree. This took me time to really get. Because I wanted to get people to my side. To make someone see things the way I did. But it’s also OK to simply have different opinions about things. And to leave it at that. I found that life became lighter and simpler when I started to accept this idea and perspective.

5. Set boundaries for yourself.

If you say no to yourself, if you set a few firm boundaries for yourself then it will, over time, become easier to do the same towards other people too. And these boundaries can also help you to focus better on what matters the most to you.

A couple of my daily ones that have helped me with both of those things are:

  • A start-time and a stop-time for work. I don’t work before 8 in the morning and my work computer is shut off – at the latest – at 7 in the evening.
  • Work in a no-distraction zone. I keep email notifications and messaging programs off. And my smart phone is on silent mode at the other end of our apartment.
  • Only check email once a day. Otherwise it’s easy for me to lose focus and to have too many thoughts swirling around in my mind while working.

6. Strengthen your self-esteem.

Why’s this important?

As you value yourself, your time, and your energy more, it becomes more natural to say no when you need to.  And criticism and negative words will bounce off of you more easily and more often.

Plus, you’ll be less concerned about getting everyone else to like you all the time. Because now you like and respect yourself more and your dependency upon what others may think or say, drops drastically.

7. Keep your focus on what YOU want out of your life.

If you know what’s most important to you and you keep your focus on that each day then you’ll naturally start to say no and stop being so people pleasing. Because now your energy and time is mostly focused on your needs and wants.

You’re not just drifting along anymore without a clear focus (which is great because when you lack that then it’s easy to fall into the trap of just going along with what someone else wants).

So how do you do this practically?

Well, fine-tuning what you want deep down might take some time. But a good start is this…

  • Ask yourself: what’s the top 3 most important things in my life right now? It could be your small business. Your family. Your career, health, dog, photography hobby, soccer, improving your social life or simplifying your home. Or something else.
  • Create 1-3 reminders. Write down your top 3 most important things on a small piece of paper. And put it on your bedside table so you see it first thing every morning. You can also create 2 more notes with the same answers to for instance put on your fridge and in your workspace.

These simple steps have helped me a lot to keep my priorities straight and to remind myself every day not to drift too much from what matters the most to me.

Emotional First Aid

It really is amazing how we are all taught about hygiene and physical first aid – you know what to do when your hands are dirty before handling food, or when someone has scrapped their knee, all the way to CPR – yet we are never trained or educated in providing emotional first aid for our thoughts and feelings such as how to handle stress, negative environments, difficult relationships and so on.

As our thoughts and feelings control so much of our daily existence, it makes sense to learn some emotional first aid.

In this article I want to start with those pesky negative thoughts and emotions. You know the ones that won’t go away and keep going around in your head!

There are times for all of us when we experience anger, grief, anxiety, stress, remorse, embarrassment or any of the range of negative emotions. Life is not always easy and in those trying times we struggle mentally with our thoughts and emotions, trying to talk our way out of them, or possibly trying to distract ourselves with activities or trying to drown it out with food, or drink or something even stronger.

Interestingly all these paths perpetuate negativity in the long run. So what can you do? How can you stop those negative thoughts and feelings?

How about instead of trying to suppress them, you turn your attention inwards?

I use this great little 4 step process to help deal with negative thoughts and emotions. It is called RAIN.

RAIN stands for –

R Recognise

A Allow

I investigate

N Non-identification

Recognise

The first step is to recognise and name what is happening and what you are feeling. “I am feeling stressed” or “I am feeling overwhelmed”. Stop for a moment and tune into the present moment of what is happening in your body and mind – the thoughts, the emotions, the sensations. Don’t inhibit what is happening, or suppress it, or ignore it or try to conquer it. Instead develop an attitude of open curiosity and acceptance.

Acknowledge that the emotion is there.

By recognising and naming what you are feeling you are giving yourself the space to care for yourself.

Allow

The acknowledgement and acceptance of your feelings and thoughts provides a sense of permission to allow life to be just as it is. Allowing doesn’t mean we have to like the situation however it does soften or drop our mental resistance to what is happening. You can embrace or hold the feeling in your awareness, which in turn can calm and soothe you.

This step is so important as we generally have an unconscious impulse to push away, suppress or ignore difficult emotions. When we engage in this inner struggle we unwittingly create more suffering and tension.

By allowing yourself to accept your present emotions and thoughts without judgment, you will almost immediately have a sense of softening and ease around the emotion, as you will have created a mental space around it. You are now witnessing your emotion rather than being enmeshed by it.

This is then an act of self-compassion.

Investigate

Now that you are calmer and allowing yourself to sit with whatever negative thought or emotion you may be experiencing, you can ask yourself questions like “Why do I feel this way?” “Where did this feeling come from?” “What is it that I really need?”

Ask what event may have triggered the feeling. Or are there physical factors such as lack of sleep. It may be that particular kinds of thoughts were the cause – worrying about something or someone, ruminating over a comment a colleague made last week, and so on. You may also find that you have particular values or beliefs of how things should be that may have contributed to your negative feelings.

By asking these questions and investigating where the negativity comes from, we can develop a truly insightful relationship with our emotions and thoughts. And as time goes by, we can even resolve and dissolve some of the negative thoughts or emotions.

Non-Identification

This step is the simple realisation that you are not your mind or your emotions. You are the awareness that lies beneath every thought, emotion and sense perception.

Non-identification means that you are truly not defined by your thoughts and emotions. This brings a sense of freedom and ease, and at the heart of it all a sense of peace.

Remember that no matter how intense or painful the emotional storm, there is always a part of you, which is still, silent and untouched.

The RAIN method can be used anytime you feel stressed, overwhelmed, or out of touch. It helps to centre you during challenging times.

As Eckhart Tolle said, “Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists”.

To learn more about the RAIN method, read the works of Tara Brach such as http://www.mindful.org/tara-brach-rain-mindfulness-practice/. Tara Brach is a clinical psychologist and author of “True Refuge: Finding Peace & Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart.”

 

 

 

The Heart of Entrepreneurship

So you want your business to be more entrepreneurial and your employees more innovative and productive? But what does that really mean to you? I suspect that you want your employees to still provide the service and quality on which you have and are building your reputation but with the added ability to add value to your business without you having to be there all the time to tell them how.

So how do you go about creating a more innovative and entrepreneurial environment?

Firstly we need to understand what entrepreneurship means. The press often define the term as starting and operating a new business. Managers on the other hand describe entrepreneurship in such terms as innovative, flexible, dynamic, risk taking, creative and growth oriented and these views are often used to describe the success of organisations such as Apple Computer, Google and General Electric.

However none of these definitions are precise enough for managers wishing a more entrepreneurial organisation. For every successful company there are thousands of new restaurants, clothing stores, and consulting firms who have tried to be innovative, creative and growth oriented – yet have failed.

So how can you be different? How can you make innovation, flexibility and creativity operational? To help answer these questions, we need to look at entrepreneurial behaviour.

Numerous writers on the topic suggest that the best approach is to view managerial behaviour in terms of extremes. At one extreme you have the entrepreneur who feels confident of his or her ability to seize opportunities, expecting surprises and the need to adjust to changes, with the ability to make the most of these changes and to make things happen. At the other extreme, you have the administrator who is fearful of change and the unknown and whose inclination is to bring things back to the way they were.

Most of us exist between these two extremes and research has shown that there is a close relationship between opportunity and individual needs. Companies of all sizes have difficulty in encouraging entrepreneurship when the individual’s needs and the company’s interest do not coincide. It is not an easy task.

The pressures that push a company to either end of the scale are often determined by factors of timing and resources coupled with personal, organisational and competitive forces.

However, the difference in approaches becomes apparent in response to the following questions.

Where is the opportunity for my business?

The first step to identify an opportunity requires a market or external approach rather than an internal or resource approach. It is important to remember here that most readily available information is generalised and intended to inform in a general way. Rarely is generalised information, which just about anyone can access, tailored enough to support business decision making, which has to occur in the context of a particular company’s situation.

The entrepreneur however is attuned to environmental changes, constantly scanning information, which may provide a favourable opportunity, while the administrator seeks to preserve resources and reacts defensively to possible threats.

Administratively oriented companies approach new opportunities more cautiously, while successful market oriented businesses are aware that change is inevitable and therefore keep their organisations learning.

Entrepreneurs are however not just opportunistic gamblers. They are also creative and innovative. They many not necessarily break new ground but perhaps may mix old ideas in such a way as to provide new services or applications. Some new software companies for example are simply altering slightly existing technology or repackaging it to accommodate new perceived market segments.

What resources do I have and how do I control them?

Necessity is the mother of invention and many people who start a business make imaginative use of their limited resources. An engineer may discover selling skills which she or he never knew they possessed or a restaurant owner may quickly adjust to waiting on tables. Most of the risk in entrepreneurial management lies in the effort to pursue opportunities with inadequate or inappropriate resources.

The only control that an entrepreneur needs from a resource is the ability to use it while an administrator believes that resources are inadequately controlled unless they are owned or on the payroll. Using external resources as required is in itself an opportunity to maintain costs while providing a service equal to or better than larger competitors. Entrepreneurs learn to use other people’s resources well while keeping the option open on bringing them in-house.

A small publishing company may hire a free lance to make editorial improvements, or contract with a typesetting company or binding company and even contract with a public relations firm to sell the book to stores. There is no need therefore to control all the resources necessary.

It should be remembered however that apart from the effective allocation of scarce resources, successful entrepreneurs seek plateaux of success where they can consolidate their gains before moving to pursue further opportunities. It is important, when possible, to pause to give both employees and internal systems time to adjust. This may not always be possible however as booming markets often don’t allow growing companies the luxury of a pause.

What structure is best?

In organising business, there is a distinct difference between the entrepreneur and the administrator. The entrepreneur tries to “feel” the way events are unfolding. The administrator on the other hand views organisational relationships more formally ie rights, responsibilities and authority.

Power and status, expressed in a hierarchy and financial rewards, push companies towards the administrative end with the control of the resources also influencing the approach to a business operation.

Businesses that use or rent resources by necessity develop informal networks both internally and externally from which new opportunities may be gleaned.

It is up to individual companies to allow favourable conditions for entrepreneurship to flourish. That means encouraging the pursuit of opportunity, the most appropriate commitment and use of resources and the breakdown of hierarchy. These goals are not that easy to reach particularly if your company needs to be turned around.

It is much easier and safer for companies to stay with the familiar than to explore the unknown. Only by encouraging change and experimentation can companies of all sizes adapt and grow in the midst of uncertainty.

 

Outperforming Competitors

Most organizations today are not structured or organized properly to make good decisions that will help them outperform their competition in the marketplace.

 The benefits gained by successfully anticipating a competitor’s future plans and strategies are generally self-evident. The consequences of making decisions based on information that is incomplete, inaccurate, or late are as severe.

Today’s managers face an abundance of information in their decision-making contexts, and sometimes this information abundance causes them to be paralyzed. Much information arriving to top managers is biased, distorted, subjective, filtered, and/or late.

Modern Competitive Intelligence (CI) practitioners are stimulated by using their unique set of skills, knowledge, abilities, and instincts to uncover relationships that enable their organizations to compete more effectively. Most CI practice includes a heavy dose of analytical capabilities.

CI can be described as the process by which organizations gather information about competitors and the competitive environment and, ideally, apply it to their planning processes and decision-making in order to improve their enterprise’s performance.

CI links signals, events, perceptions, and data into discernible patterns and trends concerning the business and competitive environment. CI can be simple scanning, such as analyzing a company’s annual report and other public documents, or elaborate, such as performing a fully digitized, multi-day war -gaming exercise.

 Decision makers are charged with answering a small number of very powerful questions about their organization, including the following:

  1. What is our current status or situation?
  2. What are our options?
  3. In which direction (-s) do we want to go?
  4. Which direction can and should we go?
  5. How can we effectively get to where we have decided we are going?
  6. How will we know that we have reached our desired goal (-s)?

 

 Answering these questions is the foundation for a competitive intelligence practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW HIGH CAN YOU JUMP?

A flea can jump up 7 inches (18 cm) and sideways 13 inches (33 cm) or about two hundred times the length of their own body! For you that would be about 200 times your height (900 feet)!

If you wanted to train a flea to perform in a flea circus, you find a short drinking glass. Find a bunch of healthy fleas (be creative!), put them in the container and cover the top. Don’t take the cover off for three days. When you do, you’ll see the flea only jumps as tall as the glass was and never again further! (This goes for their next generation of fleas too.)

Application for YOU – Do you have any unsuspected “flea training” in your life that whispers: “You can’t jump that high! Don’t even try!” Your history doesn’t create your future …(sometimes it can help), but sometimes it limits you in ways you’re blind to.

We all have choices in our lives – day to day choices, life choices, choices about our friends (we can’t choose our families – although we can choose how to behave/react with them!), choices about how we show up at work, our attitudes, our thoughts even our beliefs.  And the more coaching I do, the more I see how much we limit our choices to staying in the ‘safe’ zone (under that glass!).

Often times we become blind to the myriad of choices that are available to us as well as the range of options before us.

Why is that so?

The key element that defines our choices is our thinking.  Our thinking in turn is driven by the “personal” energy we have.

Our personal energy is affected by the sum of all of our life’s experiences. Our learning, beliefs, values, principles, emotional scars, and even our mother’s favourite sayings all aggregate together and help form the filters through which we view and live life.

For example, if your life’s experiences taught you to be overly cautious and fearful, then, when presented with a challenge, you will see that challenge through cautious and fearful eyes, and act accordingly.

Our personal energy is created by the interplay of catabolic and anabolic energy which drives our choices, our ability to change, and our ability to maximise our current strengths.

What do I mean by this?

Catabolic energy = destructive, contracting, resisting energy (cat = down, against)

Anabolic energy = constructive, expanding, fueling energy (ana = building, upward)

Both types of energies are valuable and applicable in certain areas of life.  Catabolic energy is necessary for immediate survival needs. If you were attacked by a lion, for instance, you’d want the burst of adrenaline and cortisol (catabolic hormones) to help you run as fast as you could.  As a short-term survival/coping mechanism, catabolic energy can work well.  Long term it is destructive and unsustainable.

Anabolic energy looks and feels different from catabolic energy. This energy is behind everything from creativity and intuition to compassion and caring. This type of energy fuels your body, your performance, your perceptions and choices, and your interactions.

The more anabolic, powerful energy you have, the more capacity, or potential, you have to achieve whatever it is you wish to do, and also, the more satisfaction you will experience in your life.

So is this the year that you will choose to take steps to create the life you want…and jump way before your height?

If you’re looking for a new direction, or to make those goals that seem so elusive become reality do this quick checklist. Yes, it’s simple, but take your time (reflect on where your thinking and judgments may be coming from) – maybe over your next cup of coffee.

Quick checklist to start the new financial year – list the three key items for each question:

  • What am I proud of accomplishing over the past year?
  • What didn’t I do that is still outstanding?
  • What am I most pleased with?
  • What am I most disappointed with? (don’t dwell on this – just note it down, it’s important to face your ‘failures’ and deal with them)
  • What would I like truly like to achieve this year in my:
    • Work life
    • Personal life
    • Health and Physical Goals

These aspects of your life are intertwined and will each impact on the other.

  • How will I make these become reality and am I ready to do this?

Taking the first step is the hardest but it is your choice whether you take that first step and the next one.

If you identify with the above, then I invite you as a valued reader, to chat to me over a coffee, in person, by phone or Skype and let’s see if you are ready to make your goals become reality THIS YEAR!

Any groundless or unrealistic beliefs will limit your energy and prevent you from achieving your goals – just like the lid on the flea training glass!

Working with a coach may help you leap even higher and in a coaching program, you can:

Consider your goals and aspirations

  1. Identify old assumptions holding you back
  2. Isolate and evaluate established, but unfounded and untested beliefs about your ability to achieve these goals
  3. Search for doubts about your worthiness to reach your goals
  4. Hunt for fears that may be lingering in your heart

 

My goal is to work with people for change – one person at a time.  What is yours?

 

 

 

 

 

The One Constant In Our Life Is Change

“Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they’re finished.” Dan Gilbert shares recent research on a phenomenon he calls the “end of history illusion,” where we somehow imagine that the person we are right now is the person we’ll be for the rest of time. Hint: that’s not the case. WATCH THIS VIDEO BELOW!

 

What Is Your Fear?

Are you pursing the goals that matter most to you?

Are you satisfied with your level of success?

Are you glad to be where you are in life?

Are you playing YOUR own game or are you playing someone else’s game?

Everything seems hard. We are all busy and we are all tired. We all don’t have enough money. We all know someone who says we can’t or that we would never make it. And then we are worried with what comes next. Are these excuses familiar to you?

What about these –

  • Fear of change
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of not being good enough
  • Waiting for something to happen
  • Perfectionism
  • Being overwhelmed with all that you have to do
  • Not knowing how

 

Well guess what – there is a battle going on….. and it is between your ears!!

Don’t surrender!

While your fears may be real they are not good enough reasons for inaction. Your biggest work is in front of you.

One of the most powerful, definitely frightening, and certainly most challenging actions we can take is to be fully responsible for who we are, how we behave and how we want to live our life.

It’s so much easier to blame others when things go wrong, when you get angry, upset or fearful when nothing seems to go right. When your boss avoids you, your partner abuses you or your family puts you down. But how would it be if you could take control – and turn this around? Powerful? – yes, and it’s all in your hands.

So here are some tips to help you overcome your excuses.  They are not in any particular order. Some are quick solutions and others take work –

 

  • Identify your goal and embrace it. Use this question as a start. What do you want the change to look like? How will that give your life meaning? Think about it – even go for a walk to reflect on it.

 

  • Create the space – even a small space (or time) to make a change.

 

  • Be accountable to someone while surrounding yourself with others making similar changes themselves.

 

  • Get help and insight to uncover and understand the core of the fear that is holding you back.

 

  • Take small steps that will move you forward. Movement begets movement. Now take another small step…… and change is created.

 

I find that most of my clients have difficulty addressing their fears because, in the end, it might show how vulnerable they really feel. However if we don’t understand what is holding us back how can we then create the lives we truly desire.

You know by letting any of your worries (also known as fears) out into the light and talking about it with someone who understands, it becomes a whole lot easier to see the situation or issue for what it really is.

Just venting can make a huge difference to your perspective.

If you don’t have anyone to talk to at the moment write it out. It means you get your issue out of your head, clarify your thoughts and find clarity in the small steps available to you to move forward.

Choose to no longer go along with the ride. It is your turn to drive. Choose your own route and own what comes of it.

It is really time to decide what you intend to do next and what the next few years will mean to you. Self leadership is all about leading the life you want, while energised for success!

 

About the Author

For over 25 years Babette Bensoussan has served as an advisor to organisations and business leaders around the world. A recognised global authority on Competitive Intelligence, and one of the most published authors and well-regarded speakers in her field, Babette brings valuable insights to entrepreneurs, business leaders and senior executives.

If you want some support to overcome your fear or just want to touch base, email me today!

The New Supercompetitors

Since the mid-1990, the source of competitive advantage has been shifting.  Leading companies used to be diverse conglomerates that based their competitive strategy on assets, positions, and economies of scale. Today’s market leaders, by contrast, are more focused enterprises. If you aspire to become a supercompetitor, WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW:

If you haven’t done your analysis, maybe you might want to look at some techniques in my book here

Competing with free

While some may only grudgingly admit it, competition is good for business. The presence of competitors means that there are plenty of paying customers around. Also, by creating choice, competition forces you to compete for your customers’ attention and money, which, in turn, improves your focus on what it is that makes your business and its products unique and valuable to your customers.

Equally, competition results in better business practices. By watching what your competitors do, you can learn about their business and, in turn, learn how to make your business more efficient. Having competitors in the market means you must continually stay one step ahead, which has a very positive impact on innovation and consumer demand.

But not all competition is good – or, at least, certain types of competition can be very bad for business.

The most dangerous competitor is one whose primary competitive tool appears to be aggressive price competition, either rapidly moving prices down or, worse, selling products or services below cost, in an apparent effort to win sales volume.

How can your business compete with an ‘irrational’ competitor who offers equivalent products or service below cost or for free?

The first step is to return to the basics of competitive strategy, which is defining your business goals and objectives. As Michael Porter has observed:

“Economic value is created when customers are willing to pay a price for a product or service that exceeds the cost of producing it. When goals are defined in terms of volume or market share leadership, with profits assumed to follow, poor strategies often result.”

Smart businesses shoot for margin, not sales volumes and market share. While huge top-line numbers might appear more impressive, Year 9 maths belies the myth of market share: it is just as profitable to sell 1,000 widgets for $50 with a $5 margin as it is to sell 5000 widgets for $20 with a $1 margin.

Where you face intense (even irrational) price competition from one or more competitors, it is important to refocus your efforts on developing a value proposition that delivers a benefit, or set of benefits, that is different from that of your competitors and that creates unique value for a key set of customers.

Refocusing your efforts to target consumer segments for which you are able to create unique value, or which fall outside those segments targeted by price-driven competitors, will require strict discipline.

Usually it will involve making a series of trade-offs, such as ceasing development of certain product features, or abandoning certain market activities. The end objective is redefining your value proposition to avoid head-to-head competition with price-oriented competitors, and shifting your focus to those customers’ needs for which you have a competitive advantage in addressing.

It is also important to understand the underlying cause of the competitor’s apparent ‘irrationality’. It may be that the competitor is merely responding to competitive moves by other businesses – including, perhaps, yours.

You should review your recent market initiatives to determine whether they triggered the problematic response. You should also review how you are communicating your business’s strategy to the broader market.

Very few business leaders are, in fact, irrational, and if your competitors are able to mark out a discrete section of the market to play in, without going into head-to-head competition, they usually will.

Adapted from ” Competing with Free” by Mark Neely.

 

The Survival Manager’s Guide to Competitive Insights

For years companies have been establishing competitive intelligence (CI) capability to watch their external environment and provide early warning of threats and opportunities.  While establishing such units is more relevant than ever in these times of rapid change, many units are being eliminated while others aren’t providing the value that had originally been hoped for.   The unfortunate result is that companies have stopped watching their external environment at a time when their businesses could most benefit from the insights and early warning that true CI can provide.

Why CI endeavours may fail

The reason that many of these so-called CI units fail is because they were never intelligence units to begin with; they were data collecting teams.  Almost anyone in an organisation can collect data.  Intelligence, on the other hand, is forward-looking and decision-relevant.  It provides early analysis of emerging trends so that management can begin to act before events force them to.

With good intelligence capability, executives can begin to anticipate, rather than react to, the events that are taking place in the external environment.  Companies with effective intelligence capabilities say their CI units have generated millions of dollars in increased revenues or cost savings – easily offsetting the costs of running these units.

The difference between the teams that succeed and those that do not, is the ability to establish an ongoing dialogue with top management about upcoming decisions.  Those CI teams who fail to establish this dialogue, often guess the decisions management is facing and deliver information that is not relevant or useful.  Further, if a CI unit is buried deep within an organisation, it will never establish this type of strategic dialogue with its users – unfortunately, this is where the majority of intelligence efforts begin.

Can You Survive?

If your company has a CI unit, and if you are part of this unit, ask yourself the following:

  • Does the unit delivery unique insights that can’t easily be found elsewhere?
  • Does the unit deliver forward-looking analysis that directly supports management decisions?
  • How often does the unit deliver information that has already been published on a website or other medium?
  • If the unit were eliminated tomorrow, how easily could the organisation adjust?

If your CI unit doesn’t fare well against these criteria, the odds are against its long-term survival.  Both management and the CI team should start taking steps to keep it alive.

Survival Tips

To survive, keep the following rules in mind:

  • Ask yourself what future decisions will the CI unit support – not what kinds of information it should collect. Decision-relevance is critical to the unit’s survival.
  • Place the unit where it can have ready access to the decision makers that it will support.
  • Staff the unit with experienced professionals who can function on a peer level with users of intelligence.
  • Don’t task the unit with collecting only published information or other data that can easily be found elsewhere.

Those who follow these few rules will go a long way to ensuring that their competitive intelligence unit will survive and provide tangible value and return on investment.  Those who do not will be fighting the odds against the unit’s long-term survival.

 

 

 

The Paradox Of Choice

Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz’s estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied. This is a wonderful video on the power of choice, watch it now.

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                 

Choose: One habit At A Time

We all struggle with our habits — sticking to them, staying motivated, getting started, dealing with disruptions, it can become a big struggle.

And yet, to change our habits is to change our lives. If we can’t make habit changes, we will be stuck in our current way of doing things, which might not be so helpful.

If you want to lose weight, beat procrastination, write a book, get fit, live mindfully … you have to develop habits.

Luckily, the process is simpler than most people realize. Simple, not easy: you have to be committed and really want to make the change. Otherwise you’ll just quit when things get difficult.

Here’s the first thing to keep in mind: just choose one habit for now. Yes, you’ll want to change a bunch of things. Don’t ignore my advice. Later, you can form more, but for now, focus on just one.

With that in mind, follow these simple steps:

1. Start super small. I’ve said this a million times on this blog, so you might gloss over this one — but don’t. It’s the most important thing. Do one habit at a time, and do it super small. How small? Just meditate for 2 minutes. Just write for 5 minutes. Just do 5 pushups or 5 sun salutations. Just eat one vegetable a day. If you start small, you remove the resistance to starting, which is the hardest part. I used to tell myself, “Just put on your shoes and get out the door,” and that’s how I formed my running habit, and I ended up running several marathons and an ultramarathon because of this small habit. For meditation, I tell myself, “Just get your butt on the cushion.” For drawing, just get out your pad & pencil.

2. Remove choice. Don’t think about it — make a decision ahead of time to do it every day at the same time for at least a month, then each day, don’t make it a decision. Just start. Have a trigger that’s already in your daily life (like waking up, or showering, brushing your teeth, starting the coffee maker, eating lunch, whatever) and use that as the trigger for an when/then statement: “When I wake up, I’ll meditate for 2 minutes.” Put written reminders near where the trigger happens. The main point is: make the decision to do it every day, and then just do it without thinking.

3. Get some accountability. Have at least one person you report to — an accountability partner. Or a group of friends. Or a walking/running partner. It doesn’t matter how you set it up, but having someone to report to means you are much more likely to push yourself past resistance when it comes up.

4. Make it fun, find gratitude. Don’t just do the habit as if it were a chore. See if you can enjoy it. How can you make it fun, play, joyous? Can you find gratitude in the middle of your workout? The habit is much more likely to stick if you focus on the parts you enjoy, rather than mindlessly try to check it off your to-do list.

5. Be committed. Why are you doing this habit? Reflect on this during the first week, as you do the habit. What deeper reason do you have? Are you doing this habit to help others? As an act of self-love, so that you can be healthier or happier? If you’re just doing it because you think you should, or because it sounds cool, you won’t really push past the resistance.

You can start with just the first item above, but I would recommend adding as many of the other four as you can during your first week or two, because you’ll be increasing your odds of success with each one.

This is doable. You can change your old ways by consciously doing something new repeatedly, until it’s a habit. Take small steps to get started, remove choice so you don’t think about whether to start or not, get some accountability and understand your motivation so you push past resistance, and find gratitude in the midst of the action.

One habit, done daily. Small steps with intention, support and a smile. It can make all the difference in the world.

Source: This above article was written by Leo Babauta, “The 5 Keys To Forming Any Habit”, April 21, 2017.

Top 10 Self-Limiting Beliefs

…that silently sabotages us in life…

1. I’m too old

2. I’m not smart enough

3. I am not educated enough

4. I’m afraid of trying and failing

5. You have to have money to make money

6. I’ve already tried everything

7. I can’t do that

8. I don’t feel I really deserve it

9. I’ll never be able to do that

10. All the good ones are taken

Maybe you can relate to some these statements? If you are subtly making yourself a victim by your unconscious thought, try exchanging some of the things you say by more positive, actionable and responsible things which gives you control. You can choose.

Some positive statements:

1. I’m too old – You are never too old to set a new goal or dream a new dream

2. I’m not smart enough – I am good enough. I am smart and I can do anything I put my mind too

3. I am not educated enough – I am intelligent enough to succeed

4. I’m afraid of trying and failing – Yes I might fail but I don’t try, I’ll never know

5. You have to have money to make money – Just start, take actions, embrace uncertainty and create your future

6. I’ve already tried everything – Try again or try something new

7. I can’t do that – What have you done successfully in the past?

8. I don’t feel I really deserve it – Am I being fair saying that?

9. I’ll never be able to do that – Well never is a long time.

10. All the good ones are taken – They are still lots of interesting and kind people out there

 

Key Steps To Blitzing Tough Decisions

When faced with a tight deadline, many leaders just go with their gut. How can you avoid bad moves in decision-making, and feel confident that you are making the best decision?

  • Don’t rely on intuition alone. Overconfidence in your own intuition, can lead you to select data that supports your initial conclusion, rather than looking at the broader picture. Be more analytical and fact based in your approach.
  • Be aware of bias and realistically assess your knowledge of the situation, by bringing a range of data to the table. If you don’t have the time initially to get all the facts, be aware and open about this and factor it into your decision – allowing a review once a clearer picture is available.
  • Do a pre-mortem to deal with pitfalls before they happen. Look at why your decision may lead to failure, listing all the possibilities, and use this information to tweak the decision to avoid this outcome.
  • Review whether past experience offers a reliable platform to move forward from. Actions already taken can anchor subsequent thinking. Avoid the emotional response to believing previous decisions were correct and look from an outside perspective when addressing a new situation.
  • Be aware of emotional platforms that may sway your decisions. Open your eyes to blindspots. Understand who or what are the major sources of influence that may affect your objectivity.

 

Taking these extra steps when facing tough decisions can mean the difference between success and failure.

Leaders need to be aware that they may have surrounded themselves with people who think as they do. Everyone needs a challenger – so don’t shy away from opposition: embrace and encourage it for better decision-making.

If you are looking for a creative and ethical challenger give me a call on +61 (0) 2 9411 3900– The Decision-Making Maverick.

How To Influence Decision Makers

Here is a wonderful article from Marshall Goldsmith, giving advice on how to be more effective in influencing up. Maybe there is an answer there for you too.

 1. Accept the facts

 Every decision that affects our lives will be made by the person who has the power to make that decision, not the “right” person or the “smartest” person or the “best” person. Make peace with this fact. Once we make peace with the fact that the people who have the power to make the decisions always make the decisions and we get over whining that “life isn’t fair,” we become more effective in influencing others and making a positive difference. We also become happier.

2. Realise You Must Sell Your Ideas

 When presenting ideas to decision-makers, realize that it is your responsibility to sell, not their responsibility to buy. In many ways, influencing ultimate decision-makers is similar to selling products or services to external customers. They don’t have to buy–you have to sell. No one is impressed with salespeople who blame their customers for not buying their products. While the importance of taking responsibility may seem obvious in external sales, an amazing number of people in large corporations spend countless hours blaming management for not buying their ideas. A key part of the influence process involves the education of decision-makers. The effective influencer needs to be a good teacher.

3. Focus on contribution to the larger good – not just the achievement of your objectives

 An effective salesperson would never say to a customer, “You need to buy this product, because if you don’t, I won’t achieve my objectives.” Effective salespeople relate to the needs of the buyers, not to their own needs. In the same way, effective influencers relate to the larger needs of the organization, not just to the needs of their unit or team.

4. Strive to win the big battles

Don’t waste your energy and psychological capital on trivial points. Executives’ time is very limited. Do a thorough analysis of ideas before challenging the system. Focus on issues that will make a real difference. Be willing to lose on small points. Be especially sensitive to the need to win trivial non-business arguments on things like restaurants, sports teams, or cars. You are paid to do what makes a difference and to win on important issues. You are not paid to win arguments on the relative quality of athletic teams.

5. Present a realistic “cost-benefit” analysis of your ideas – don’t just sell benefits.

Every organization has limited resources, time, and energy. The acceptance of your idea may well mean the rejection of another idea that someone else believes is wonderful. Be prepared to have a realistic discussion of the costs of your idea.

6. Challenge up on issues involving ethics or integrity – never remain silent on ethics violations

The best of corporations can be severely damaged by only one violation of corporate integrity. Refuse to compromise on company ethics. Take action immediately.

7. Realise that powerful people also make mistakes

Don’t say, “I am amazed that someone at this level…” It is realistic to expect decision-makers to be competent; it is unrealistic to expect them to be anything other than normal humans. Focus more on helping them than judging them.

8. Don’t be disrespectful.

While it is important to avoid kissing up to decision-makers, it is just as important to avoid the opposite reaction.

Before speaking, it is generally good to ask one question from four perspectives. “Will this comment help 1) our company 2) our customers 3) the person I am talking to, and 4) the person I am talking about?” If the answers are no, no, no, and no, don’t say it!

9. Support the final decision.

 Treat decision-makers the same way that you would want to be treated. If you stab that person in the back in front of your direct reports, what are you teaching them to do when they disagree with you?

10. Make a positive difference–don’t just try to “win” or “be right.”

We can easily become more focused on what others are doing wrong than on how we can make things better. An important guideline in influencing up is to always remember your goal: making a positive difference for the organization. Focus on making a difference. The more other people can be “right” or “win” with your idea, the more likely your idea is to be successfully executed.

11. Focus on the future let go of the past.

One of the most important behaviors to avoid is whining about the past. Have you ever managed someone who incessantly whined about how bad things are? Nobody wins. Successful people love getting ideas aimed at helping them achieve their goals for the future. By focusing on the future, you can concentrate on what can be achieved tomorrow, not what was not achieved yesterday.

In summary, think of the years that you have spent “perfecting your craft.” Think of all of the knowledge that you have accumulated. Think about how your knowledge can potentially benefit your organisation. How much energy have you invested in acquiring all of this knowledge? How much energy have you invested in learning to present this knowledge to decision-makers so that you can make a real difference? My hope is that by making a small investment in learning to influence decision-makers, you can make a large, positive difference for the future of your organization.

Source: This above article was written by Marshall Goldsmith, “11 Ways to Influence Key Decision makers”, April 30, 2015.

Leadership Decision Making in a VUCA World

Today’s business environment is best described as VUCA – Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous. VUCA is, quite simply, the expression of the fact that the rate of change is outpacing our ability to adapt.

As a result of this, businesses, industries and careers are disrupted faster than ever before. We have to seriously rethink about how we lead ourselves, others and our organisations. Old ways of leadership have to give way to newer mental models based on agility in decision making, critical thinking, adaptable learning, people orientation and responsiveness to change.

Whilst none of us is really in control of our environment, most of us are working hard to anticipate the changing conditions of our business.

In his series of blogs in HBR late 2010 – early 2011, the late former US Army Colonel Eric Kail outlined adaptive leadership tactics for operating in a VUCA world –

For Volatile Situations…

  • Communicate clearly
  • Ensure that your intent is understood

 

For Uncertain Situations…

  • Get a fresh perspective
  • Be flexible

 

For Complex Situations…

  • Develop collaborative leaders
  • Stop seeking permanent solutions

 

For Ambiguous Situations…

  • Listen well
  • Think divergently
  • Set up incremental dividends

 

While his advice was constructed within the context of small-unit combat activities in the military I believe it is easily convertible into applications for all organisations.

The antidote to VUCA is about moving from Volatility to Vision, from Uncertainty to Understanding, from Complexity to Clarity and from Ambiguity to Agility. This means exercising leadership in every aspect of our lives and exercising leadership means making wise decisions.

Adapted from: “Adaptive Leadership for the VUCA World: A tale of Two Managers”, Paul Kinsinger, June 6, 2016, Global Business Magazine